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Welcome to the Intermountain Section AWWA’s 2021 Annual Conference

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Tuesday, October 8
 

5:00pm MDT

 
Wednesday, October 9
 

7:30am MDT

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

Drawing on Experience to Benefit Water For People.
Purchase Tickets to have an opportunity to win an experience - See Registration or online to purchase tickets.

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Wednesday October 9, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm MDT
Limelight Promenade

8:00am MDT

9:30am MDT

OPENING GENERAL SESSION The Watershed Restoration Initiative: A Partnership-based Program To Improve High Priority Watersheds
Mike Styler has been described as a soft-spoken farmer, diplomat and executive, but as the recently retired, longest-serving Executive Director for the Utah Department of Natural Resources Mike has had his share of conflicts and battles. Under Styler’s leadership, DNR launched the Watershed Restoration Initiative, a statewide effort to improve ecosystem health and biological diversity, water quality and yield, as well as sustainable uses of Utah watersheds. To date, nearly 2,000 projects and 1.6 million acres of land have been restored. Mike will tell us about this bottom-up initiative where project planning, review, and ranking occur at a local level to restore damaged watersheds, improve water quality and yield, reduce catastrophic wildfires, restore watershed functions following wildfire, and increase habitat for wildlife populations and forage for sustainable agriculture.

Speakers
MS

Mike Styler

Retired, Past Director Utah Department of Natural Resources
Mike Styler recently retired as executive director of the Utah Department of Natural Resources after more than 14 years at the helm of an agency with 1,300-plus employees and seven divisions that include wildlife, water rights, state parks, forestry and fire, oil, gas and mining... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 9:30am - 11:00am MDT
Opera House

11:15am MDT

Corrosion and Its Control for Ductile Iron Pipelines
This presentation includes the discussion of ways to identify corrosive conditions and the means to protect ductile iron pipe in these environments. It also outlines the development and performance of polyethylene encasement as the most commonly recommended corrosion protection system for Ductile Iron pipe. Also presented in this lecture is a review of the type of research that led to the adoption of the American National Standard for Polyethylene Encasement for Ductile Iron Pipe Systems (ANSI/AWWA C105/A21.5) and numerous case histories that establish the efficacy of polyethylene encasement. Throughout the presentation 75-years of corrosion research and development are highlighted. As the talk begins to close, the development of the Design Decision Model® (DDM®) is introduced to the audience along with its associated statistical analysis. Finally, the up-to-date information on the newest type of polyethylene, V-Bio®, will be detailed and how its anti-microbial and active corrosion inhibitor laced inner layer grants an even greater level of protection.

Speakers
JB

Josh Blount

Senior Regional Engineer, Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association
I am a Senior Regional Engineer with the Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association (DIPRA) covering the West and Northwest United States. I am a licensed Professional Engineer, NACE Corrosion Technician, NACE Cathodic Protection Tester, and an Envision Sustainability Professional. As... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 11:15am - 11:45am MDT
Continental

11:15am MDT

Developing and Implementing a Comprehensive Strategic Workforce Management Plan from Recruitment to Retirement
Water utilities continue to look for innovative solutions to recruit, train, and retain the next generation of qualified employees to fill critical leadership positions left from the retirement void. This challenge can be compounded by cultures of protectionary hiring and training practices that result in staff who lack vision, education, aptitude, job knowledge, skills, and ability, leaving the utility at risk. The solution is to develop and implement an innovative strategic workforce management plan that provides an organizational paradigm shift with the following critical keys for success: Innovative hiring practices; comprehensive training programs which provide and measure employee job competence levels with present and future goals in mind; and novel succession planning with clearly identified career paths that attract millennials, provides generational training and development, all neatly packaged in a program that is cost effective and easy to implement.

This presentation will provide detailed strategic workforce solutions (30 years in the making) which are proven successful, cost effective, easy to implement, and can help utilities avoid pitfalls while leaping ahead in providing innovative workforce training and leadership development.

Speakers
avatar for Gerard Yates

Gerard Yates

Water Quality Director, Central Utah Water Conservancy District
Gerard Yates is the Water Quality/Treatment Manager for Central Utah Water Conservancy District (CUWCD). He oversees water quality, finished water distribution, laboratories, and the operations and maintenance of the District's surface water treatment plants. He has a Bachelor of... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 11:15am - 11:45am MDT
Columbine

11:15am MDT

Developing Your Integrated Water Resources Plan
Water resources managers in the West today are facing booming populations and water supplies that are seemingly less reliable. To combat this, water managers must develop integrated resource plans that include a diverse water supply portfolio. Conservation, recycling, storage, and market solutions can maintain reliability under uncertain conditions. Diversifying your water supply portfolio provides an important hedge against risk, but it also adds complexity to the process of planning, developing, and operating a water conveyance, treatment and distribution system. Tomorrow’s resource plans must be robust to meet the challenges we can see today, but adaptive enough to meet whatever the future brings.
With its booming population, robust economy and increasingly stressed water supplies, semi-arid southern California, and the Metropolitan Water District, have been at the forefront of integrated water resources planning for the past 25 years. Metropolitan’s enviable portfolio of imported water, local supplies, and storage envisions meeting southern California’s needs into the next century.
This presentation will provide information on how to leverage the experience in similar semi-arid regions to develop an integrated water resources plan the will work for your customers.

Speakers
RH

Robert Harding

Senior Principal Technologist, Jacobs Engineering
Robert Harding is a Senior Principal Technologist with Jacobs in the Salt Lake City, Utah, office. He worked for 31 years at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. The first part of his career he worked developing market solutions to water supply issues, including... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 11:15am - 11:45am MDT
Opera House

11:15am MDT

Fire's Impact to Watershed Spark Process Upgrades to Direct Filtration Plant
A little spark - miles away - changed the universe for the Duchesne Valley Water Treatment Plant. It resulted in a massive forest fire, source water quality degradation, treatment challenges, a cancelled project at 95% design, and new project to address post fire realities.

This presentation outlines how rapid things can change when a forest fire hits the watershed, what was done operationally to address the post-fire water quality, and a new process improvement project to provide long-term plant resiliency against the effects of the fire. The presentation includes how treatment processes were impacted by the post-fire water quality and the selection process for determining whether pretreatment was needed upstream or downstream of the existing ozone system.

Speakers
PC

Patrick Carlson

Project Manager, Carollo Engineers
Patrick is a project manager and process engineer with Carollo Engineers, Inc., who focuses on filtration and conventional drinking water treatment. He has over 15 years of experience which includes over 1 BGD of granular media filtration, 1.4 BGD of UV disinfection, biological treatment... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 11:15am - 11:45am MDT
Boiler Room

11:15am MDT

Key Practices for Managing Water Quality in the Distribution System
This presentation will discuss the water quality changes that may occur as the water moves through the infrastructure in the distribution system. Different water quality parameters and challenges will be discussed along with solutions. Focus will be on:
• Describing the different water quality parameters and what they tell us about distribution system health
• Identifying how to apply key practices for managing water age and quality during storage

Speakers
avatar for Joe Huish

Joe Huish

Central Utah Water Conservancy District
Joe Huish works for Central Utah Water Conservancy District where he is the lead operator at the Utah Valley Water treatment plant. He has nearly 15-years of experience in plant operation. He graduated from Utah State University with a bachelor’s degree in Geology in 2002. He started... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 11:15am - 11:45am MDT
Sawtooth

11:45am MDT

11:45am MDT

1:00pm MDT

1:00pm MDT

3 Water Treatment Plants 5 Reservoirs and 22 River Sample Sites
The Ashley Valley Water Treatment Plant, Duchesne Valley Water Treatment Plant and the Don A. Christiansen Water Treatment Plant all have different challenges in treating the raw water as it comes into the plant. These challenges are heavily influenced by natural and anthropogenic influences in the surrounding watershed. Some of these challenges include seasonal shifts in turbidity levels causing the operators to switch to a water source that has higher total organic carbon. Algal blooms in the spring and fall significantly increase filter head loss. Changes in the landscape due to fire have augmented the potential for more organic material and sediment to enter the waterway. Another challenge is having a major highway so close to the river that when a vehicle crashes there is a probability that pollutant material may enter the waterway. To determine water quality challenges and solutions within each watershed and to measure water quality coming into these 3 plants I regularly sample 5 reservoirs and 22 river sample sites. Working together, plant managers and operators continue to produce water that is safe to drink despite the many challenges that they face while treating the water.

Speakers
JC

Joe Crawford

Water Quality Scientist, Central Utah Water
In 2010 I graduated from Utah State with a Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. In 2013 I graduated from Utah State University with a Master of Science in Watershed Science.I am married and my wife Stacy and I have four children and we are currently living in Spanish... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:00pm - 1:30pm MDT
Boiler Room

1:00pm MDT

Is There a Water Supply Camelot? Navigating the USBR Contingency Plan Process and Slaying the Dragon of Drought
In collaboration with the Bureau of Reclamation, Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities recently prepared a drought contingency plan. The purpose of the document is to develop a plan for better meeting water supply needs during periods of drought. Primary focuses of the plan include evaluating the reliability of water supply, understanding future water demands, and developing a drought action plan. Most importantly, this plan will act as a tool to monitor and forecast drought issues and assist Salt Lake City in mitigating a future threat before it becomes an emergency.
The goal of this presentation will be to summarize the process used to develop this plan and then highlight some of the major lessons learned during the process. This will include tips on how to navigate the USBR drought contingency grant process and detailed information on the City’s drought monitoring tool (used to predict the severity of expected drought in a given year) and water use reduction calculator (used to predict how much water can be saved through various drought response actions).

Speakers
avatar for Keith Larson

Keith Larson

Project Manager, Bowen Collins & Associates
Keith Larson is a principal at Bowen Collins & Associates. He has received degrees from both the University of Utah and the University of California. He specializes in design, master planning, and asset management of water utilities. An essential component of all his water master... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:00pm - 1:30pm MDT
Opera House

1:00pm MDT

Never Settle on the"Best" - Always Hire the Right Candidate
A key to success for any organization is in Hiring the “right” person for each position. Often, during the interview and hiring process, we are tempted to hire the “Best” candidate instead of the “Right” person for the job. Hiring the wrong person proves to be costly for the utility and seldom has a positive outcome. Come to this presentation to learn proven technics for finding and hiring the RIGHT person for any given position within your organization thereby ensuring your team is strong and successful.

Speakers
avatar for Dave Hardy

Dave Hardy

Treatment Plant Manager, Central Utah Water Conservancy District
David Hardy is manager of the Don A. Christiansen Regional Water Treatment Plant for Central Utah Water Conservancy District. David has been involved in the operations and maintenance of water treatment plants for the past 35 years. His strengths are in his knowledge of process control... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:00pm - 1:30pm MDT
Columbine

1:00pm MDT

Old Pipe, New Tricks: A Pragmatic Approach to Partially Deteriorated Pipeline Rehab Design
This presentation is an overview of the background, alternatives analysis, design approach and construction of the trenchless rehabilitation of a 1.5 mile, 30-inch drinking water pipeline, with an emphasis on the resources and calculations used to design the liner for a “partially deteriorated” host pipe. The benefits in terms of constructability and cost are compared for the “partially deteriorated” versus “fully deteriorated” design requirements. After developing the alternatives analysis, a tight-fit HDPE liner was selected as the rehabilitation method.
The presentation also documents the construction process. This is the first tight-fit HDPE liner installation for a large diameter drinking water pipeline in the state of Utah. This project overview will be interesting for pipeline designers and city asset managers faced with the challenge of rehabilitating deteriorating infrastructure.

Speakers
MD

Mitch Dabling

Project Engineer, Jacobs Engineering
Mitch Dabling is a water conveyance engineer specializing in large diameter pipelines, hydropower development, and dam spillway design. Prior to working at Jacobs, he did physical and computational fluid modeling at the Utah Water Research Laboratory. Outside of engineering, Mitch... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:00pm - 1:30pm MDT
Continental

1:00pm MDT

Water Meter Sizing & Selection
Water meters are a long term investment, so choosing the correct meter type and size is an important decision and will affect water utility revenue for up to twenty years. In addition to type and selection, there are specific installation requirements that must be factored into engineering designs in order to achieve optimal meter reading accuracy. This presentation will cover meter types, the recent Water Resource Foundation project on residential meter accuracies and large meter installations.

Speakers
GJ

Greg Johnson

Solution Architect, Badger Meter
Greg Johnson is a Solution Architect for Badger Meter, supporting water utilities in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, and Colorado. Greg works with utilities to determine their meter and meter reading needs; matching their needs to the best meter and technology solutions. Once a solution... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:00pm - 1:30pm MDT
Sawtooth

1:30pm MDT

Moving an Organization From "That's the Way We've Always Done It" to One That Embraces Change.
An in depth look into Granger-Hunter Improvement Districts'(GHID) challenges as they have attempted to tackle issues such as Effective Utility Management, AMI, proactive versus reactive decision making, data driven decisions versus "we've always done it that way" philosophy, evaluation of core values and mission statement, merit matrix versus tenure/experience, safety culture, cross training and staff development, scrutinizing job descriptions and job expectations, how to capture the knowledge of those retiring, and life after the "silver tsunami". This session will provide some lessons learned as they have experienced change.
GHID serves a community in West Valley City of about 120,000 residents. There are about 27,000 connections, 375 miles of water line, nine storage reservoirs, eight deep wells, 320 miles of sewer line, and thirteen sewer pump stations. They currently employ 78 FTE. Since 2011, there have been 20 employees retire and another 37 employees have left for various reasons. In 2011 the average age of an employee was 47, currently it is 39. The average tenure of all GHID employees in 2019 is close to 8½ years.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Helm

Jason Helm

General Manager, CEO, Granger-Hunter Improvement District
Jason Helm is a graduate of University of Utah and began his engineering career working for a local consulting firm. He worked on projects that ranged from source water protection to water rights, from master planning water systems to design of water infrastructure. He moved from... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm MDT
Columbine

1:30pm MDT

Provo Aquifer Storage and Recovery the Path to a Long Term Sustainable Water Supply
Provo, like many cities along the Wasatch Front, is projected to grow significantly in the coming years. The projected growth, along with a trend of declining water levels in some of their wells, led them to take a proactive approach to ensure the long term sustainability of their water supply. One part of the path to sustainability for Provo includes aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). This talk will focus on the technical and physical feasibility of a successful ASR project. Topics covered will include:
• navigating water rights to identify sources available for ASR
• infiltration based ASR
• injection based ASR
• ASR site identification
• groundwater modeling as an ASR tool
As part of Provo’s ASR planning the spring runoff for the 2018-19 winter was monitored. Water content in the snow pack was used to estimate how much runoff would infiltrate and/or flow down from the mountains through the adjacent canyons east of Provo. Geophysical techniques were also used to document and observe how the flows in the streams and sediments migrated down into the valley fill aquifer in order to inform how ASR might utilize the same mechanisms to move water into the aquifers beneath Provo and bolster future water supply availability.

Speakers
JD

Jeff Davis

Vice President, Barr Engineering
Jeff Davis is a civil and environmental engineer at Barr Engineering; he is a graduate of BYU and has extensive experience with groundwater modeling and aquifer storage and recovery projects around the nation. He has more than 25 years of experience with environmental engineering... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm MDT
Opera House

1:30pm MDT

Recent Developments to Improve Pipeline Corrosion Protection: The 2019 Design Decision Model (DDM)
Corrosion Protection for DI Pipe/Identification of Corrosion Potential
External Pipeline Corrosion AWWA C-105 Design Decision Model (DDM) and External Corrosion Prevention
Recent updates to AWWA C-105 standards are included.
Explanation and discussion of a selection Matrix developed jointly by a Corrosion Engineering council and the Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association (DIPRA) of real world successes and failures in protecting buried pipelines; attendees of this session will then be able to decide for themselves what is their best option on each project they undertake. Defining the mechanisms of corrosion in simple terms, and exploring the options in protective coatings, linings, and cathodic protection systems.

Speakers
JJ

John Johnson

Regional Engineer, Western US, McWane Ductile
McWane Ductile Utah


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm MDT
Continental

1:30pm MDT

Small-Scale Ultrafiltration Systems: Design Challenges, Technology Advancements, and Case Studies
Small-scale membrane filtration systems (

Speakers
avatar for Dan  Dye

Dan Dye

Membrane Filtration Group Leader, WesTech Engineering, Inc.
WesTech Engineering, Inc.


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm MDT
Boiler Room

1:30pm MDT

Utilizing Indirect Inspection Techniques to Perform Targeted Condition Assessments and Repairs on Metallic Water Pipelines
Join ICG while they present a targeted approach to inspecting different types of water pipelines common in the industry. Many times, pipe condition data is limited, so decisions on where to directly assess pipelines are made based on leak history or Operator knowledge alone. There is, however, a more targeted approach that utilizes a variety of indirect inspection technologies, both above ground and internal, that when collected and analyzed together, can paint a more accurate picture of a pipeline's overall integrity.

Once this data is compiled, excavation locations can be selected in order to expose the most degraded anomalies along portions of pipe. This approach will save Operators more money in the long run by extending the life of the asset and minimizing resource allocation.

As these survey methods are implemented across an entire system, the data can then be used to create a Relative Risk Model. The Risk approach has been developed and refined in other pipeline industries and can be modified to fit the water industry's specific operating conditions and needs. Operators can utilize Risk Models to allocate resources over an extended period of time with the goals being to minimize Risk and prolong asset life.

Speakers
EN

Eric Nelson

Corrosion Engineer, P.E., Infinity Corrosion Group, Inc. (ICG)
Eric Nelson and his colleagues at ICG believe that infrastructure integrity is critical and with the correct processes and engineering applications the longevity of our infrastructure can be maximized. Eric got his start in Integrity and Corrosion Engineering by first working for... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 1:30pm - 2:00pm MDT
Sawtooth

2:00pm MDT

Replacing Culinary Waterlines - When and How
The talk will focus on culinary waterline replacement. Including how and when to replace waterlines. It will focus in on several key areas such as, what lines to replace based on capital facility plans, upcoming road repairs, other utility projects, whether to up size or keep current diameter based on future system needs, and fire flows. Points of connection will also be discussed in detail to determine fittings, valving and clearance issues and concerns. Additionally it will cover disinfection, isolating sections and construction scheduling.
Current project that has many of these issues is reaching completion of design and would be a great example of many of the items to be looked at and actual solutions.

Speakers
SD

Stockton Denos

Civil Engineer, Epic Engineering
Stockton is an engineering consultant for Epic Engineering. He received a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Utah. He has experience in a variety of water projects such as waterline installation, storage tanks, pump stations, secondary water reservoirs and... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm MDT
Sawtooth

2:00pm MDT

Water Taste Test Judging
Wednesday October 9, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm MDT
Limelight Promenade

2:00pm MDT

2:30pm MDT

Well Performance and Maintenance
Speakers
avatar for Brandon Nielsen

Brandon Nielsen

Project Manager, J-U-B Engineers


Wednesday October 9, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm MDT
Sawtooth

3:00pm MDT

Applying Artificial Intelligence to Water Main Condition Assessments To Support GASB 34’s Modified Approach
This session will demonstrate how Asset Management practices, when combined with the latest condition assessment tools using artificial intelligence (specifically machine learning) to assess the condition of buried water mains, provides a new method for aligning maintenance, repair and replacement strategies to better allocate limited resources.

Underground pipe performance evaluations can be established with an objective, data driven approach like machine learning and used to meet accounting’s GASB 34 Modified Approach requirement of a systemwide condition assessment every three years. This approach heavily reduces the time required by finance to report on buried infrastructure systems, while increasing the accuracy and value of the financial statements. Machine learning-based condition assessment tools are now commercially available.

It also contributes to the reduction of economic impacts incurred from water main breaks, and more efficient allocation of funding by water utilities. Use of best practices and a more accurate, objective tool will align maintenance and capital repair and replacement strategies to more efficiently leverage scarce financial and human resources. They also inject financial integrity and accountability to the planning process and refine the investment strategy so a utility will be in a better position to defend planning efforts and justify pipe replacement projects.

Speakers
DW

Dylan Winbourn

Fracta
Fracta


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm MDT
Continental

3:00pm MDT

Polymer 101 - Chemistry, Handling and Storage, Dilution Water, Optimized Mixing
Flocculation of particles into larger and easily removable forms is necessary for efficient separation by sedimentation, filtration, or dewatering. Three types of polymers are discussed in regards to physical form, molecular weight, charge density, and size distribution. Proper way of handling and storage of polymer is reviewed as well as its shelf-life.

Quality of dilution water including hardness has tremendous impact on the efficiency of polymer solution. With increasing trend of utilizing reclaimed water for polymer mixing at most WWTPs, chlorine level of dilution water must be carefully monitored. When reclaimed water is used, aging of polymer solution is also carefully evaluated. Chlorine, suspended solids, and dissolved ions included in reclaimed water are reacting with polymer and resulting in degraded polymer solution during aging.

Preparing efficient polymer solution is one of several key factors for successful solid-liquid separation. Due to its unique property of polymer, polymer make-down requires well established scientific understanding. It includes the concept of two-stage mixing; very high energy mixing at the first stage followed by low energy mixing to minimize damaging polymer chains. Two-step dilution and adequate residence time are also required to achieve fully extended molecular structure of polymer in solution.

Speakers
YK

Yong Kim

Technical Director, UGSI Solutions, Inc.
Dr. Yong Kim is Technical Director at UGSI Solutions, Inc., Vineland, NJ. His technical interest includes fluid mixing and turbulence, surface chemistry, solid-liquid separation, water and wastewater disinfection. He was previously employed by USFilter and Siemens Water Technologies... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm MDT
Boiler Room

3:00pm MDT

Small-Scale Water System Demonstration: Reducing Water-system Vulnerability, Increasing Flexibility and Creating a More Unified System by collecting, understanding and assimilating data
Centerville City’s water system will be used as an example. Physical, hydraulic and electronic models and manuals will be shown to illustrate how data-collection can be used to great advantage.
Advantages of data collection include: increased redundancy, major energy-cost savings, improved outage prevention, improved distribution efficiency, improved conservation, improved leak-detection and water-loss detection, improved consumption projections and improved water quality.
Over 20 years ago the federal government asked water operators to conduct a vulnerability assessment of their systems. As public works director for Centerville City, Randy Randall participated in this vulnerability assessment. Ever since that time, he has rigorously evaluated Centerville City’s water system to determine its strengths and weaknesses. The knowledge gained by evaluating any system’s unique strengths and weaknesses can help in determining how weaknesses can be improved. Gaining, assimilating, understanding and evaluating knowledge begins by collecting component data, statistical data (water loss, water production,etc),usage data, financial data, energy data, hydraulic data, storage data, etc.
Another water-system vulnerability assessment will soon be requested by the Federal Government, so now is a good time to begin the data-collection process.

Speakers
avatar for Randy Randall

Randy Randall

Public Works Director, Centerville City Public Works
Randy Randall has worked for Centerville City, Utah as the Public Works Director since 1982. The culinary water system, which serves 18,000 residents, is his responsibility. He has designed many innovative cost saving technologies for Centerville City. He developed off-peak pumping... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm MDT
Sawtooth

3:00pm MDT

What Can We Learn from Our Neighbors? Colorado's Approach to Stakeholder Collaboration in River Basin Planning.
Colorado published its state Water Plan in 2015 and defined a process for cyclical updates of that plan. That process includes regular updates to water demand and supply data for each of the state’s eight major river basins in a tool called the Statewide Water Supply Initiative (SWSI). Once the data is available in SWSI stakeholders in each river basins collaboratively develop basin implementation plans (BIPs) to address and close future supply gaps. Lastly, the BIPs are compiled to define statewide priorities. Once the Water Plan is updated, the process begins again. This allows stakeholders in each basin, as well as the State, to stay current in their understanding of water supply opportunities and challenges facing each unique basin and re-evaluate existing or proposed new projects and processes to meet the gap. The most recent update to SWSI adopted scenario planning to better frame and evaluate uncertain future water supply and demand conditions. This presentation will provide an overview of how the scenario planning was done to account for uncertainties in climate change and growth projections and it will highlight the keys to successful collaboration between basin stakeholders.

Speakers
ML

Matt Lindburg

Supervising Engineer, Brown and Caldwell
Brown and Caldwell


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm MDT
Opera House

3:00pm MDT

Why Cognitive Diversity Matters - A Group Problem-Solving Exercise
As water industry professionals we are constantly faced with complex challenges that require innovative solutions. In this interactive session we will demonstrate why cognitive diversity is so important and how it can help improve decision-making and innovation in any organization.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Rau

Mike Rau

Water Quality Manager, Central Utah Water Conservancy District


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm MDT
Columbine

3:30pm MDT

CFD Modeling from Pipelines to Treatment Plants
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling can help designers troubleshoot problems in hard to reach places, or predict unique flow patterns before construction. Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District's Southeast Collection Line is on a steep slope and has historically had limitations to conveying design flows during peak spring runoff. CFD modeling has been used to determine the root causes of these restrictions which include suspended bubbles in the flow stream, air binding from roll over, and limiting flow during transitions from open channel to pressurized flow. During design of the 3 Kings Water Treatment Plant in Park City, advanced hydraulic modeling was also conducted to provide critical information to support the design of various hydraulic and process elements in the facility. The modeling helped to optimize raw water splitting and mixing, sedimentation efficiency, and disinfection compliance.

Speakers
RW

Ryan Willeitner

Water Resources Engineer, Jacobs Engineering
Ryan Willeitner has a bachelors and masters from Utah State University where he published papers on CFD modeling. Ryan has worked for Jacobs for 9 years designing conveyance systems throughout the state of Utah.


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm MDT
Continental

3:30pm MDT

Solids Management: Low Tech and High Tech Solutions
Solids production at water treatment plants is influenced by many factors such as coagulant chemical dosing, raw water quality, plant production, recycle, and possible use of powdered activated carbon. Many plants are removing historically higher levels of TOC and turbidity in order to achieve regulatory compliance, to meet aesthetic objectives, or to optimize subsequent downstream processes. This has led to peak solids production quantities that exceed the original design criteria and tax plant dewatering facilities.

Selecting solids management tactics will always remain a fit-for-purpose activity. Internal factors such as staff preferences and expertise, siting, and solids composition must be considered along with external factors such as climate conditions and ultimate disposal options for project success. In some cases, conventional drying techniques such as lagoons and drying beds are being enhanced and supplemented with bags made of geofabric textiles for an old-but-new approach. Elsewhere, screw presses offer advantages with respect to reliability, uptime, and reduced labor needs and are competing directly with equipment such as centrifuges as a cost effective method for mechanical dewatering.

Operating experiences, energy and chemical (polymer) requirements, successful design arrangements, and overall performance of low tech and high-tech Solids management methods will be summarized for the benefit of utilities and design engineers, using examples from recent full-scale applications.

Speakers
KV

Katy Vandenberg

Project Manager, Stantec Consulting Services, Inc.
Katy Vandenberg is a mechanical engineer and project manager from Denver, CO. She holds a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University, and a masters degree in engineering systems management from Texas A&M University. She has spent her 14 year career in the water... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm MDT
Boiler Room

3:30pm MDT

Will Your Utility Meet the New Regional Conservation Goals? Learn how a Large Public Water Supplier Answered this Question.
The Utah Division of Water Resources' (UDWRe) new regional conservation goals, climate change impacts, and an increased desire from portions of the public to "conserve our way" out of large water supply projects require a new approach to demand forecasting. Simply using per capita usage rates specified in the regional conservation goals without verifying a utility’s ability to meet those goals can lead to water shortages in the future. While many in the public want to avoid large water supply projects, communities do not want to do so at the expense of economic growth and quality of life. This presentation will review demand projection methodologies that provide the information water utilities need to plan capital improvements that meet community expectations. The methods focus on three critical elements:
1. Accounting for economic growth in demand projections and allocations.
2. Costs to reduce usage rates to the targeted amount.
3. Time required to realize reductions in usage rates.
To illustrate how these methods can be applied, this presentation will provide an overview of how a large public water supplier implemented them during their recent Demand, Supply, and Conveyance System Study.

Speakers
avatar for Jacob Young

Jacob Young

Professional Engineer and Utah Operations Leader, Brown and Caldwell
Full Conference Attendee


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm MDT
Opera House

3:30pm MDT

Your Most Important Assets: How to Develop Them and Why
Are you losing your employees to better paying jobs, lack of motivation, moral issues, retirements, or any other circumstances? You are not alone. Now more than ever, organizations are looking at talent development to tackle these issues. Developing your most important assets can be a daunting task. This presentation will provide key concepts for meaningful employee development and strategic key leadership training design elements to help you bring your training programs to the next level. We will discuss how to know if you are training effectively, how behavior changes are measured, and what is the role of management and employees in development.

Speakers
avatar for Yvette Amparo-Espinoza

Yvette Amparo-Espinoza

Training and Development Coordinator, Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District
Yvette Amparo-Espinoza is the Training and Development Coordinator at Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District. She is originally from New York and has made Utah her home for the past 27 years. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Human Resources Management and is passionate about... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 3:30pm - 4:00pm MDT
Columbine

4:00pm MDT

Implementing a Unidirectional Flushing Program
Speakers
avatar for Charles Hale

Charles Hale

Central Utah Water Conservancy District
Chuck Hale is the Treatment Plant Manager at Central Utah Water Conservancy District’s Duchesne Valley Water Treatment Plant. He has been working in the water industry for 7 years, has a degree from ITT Tech in electronics, and 20 years of instrumentation electronics experience... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm MDT
Sawtooth

4:00pm MDT

4:30pm MDT

Practical Applications of an Hydraulic Modeling
A hydraulic model of is a powerful tool to see what is going on in your water system and help you make informed decisions that make you look smart. Whether your system is large or small, using a model to understand flows, velocities, pressures, water quality, and energy use should be accessible and simple. We will discuss practical applications of hydraulic modeling, including checking pressure swings, available fire flow, and chlorine residual. We will review specific examples where hydraulic modeling has helped water systems make good decisions such as:
• Sandy City fluoride overfeed event
• City of Ketchum pipe breaks in the Spring Line System
• Riverton City low chlorine residual
• Midvale City main pipeline shutdown

Speakers
avatar for Steve Jones

Steve Jones

Vice President, Hansen Allen & Luce
Mr. Jones is a Vice President at Hansen, Allen & Luce. He has more than 20 years of experience in the planning and design of gravity and pressurized drinking and secondary water systems, storm drain systems, sanitary sewer systems. He has extensive experience in Utah water rights... Read More →


Wednesday October 9, 2019 4:30pm - Thursday October 10, 2019 5:00pm MDT
Sawtooth
 
Thursday, October 10
 

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

Drawing on Experience to Benefit Water For People
Purchase Tickets to have an opportunity to win an experience - See Registration or online to purchase tickets.

5 Tickets for $20 - https://www.ims-awwa.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=14781468
Single Ticket $5 - https://www.ims-awwa.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=14781510

Thursday October 10, 2019 8:00am - 11:30am MDT
Limelight Promenade

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

9:00am MDT

Thursday General Session - Taming a Force of Nature: Wildland Fire Management
In the event of a disaster such as a wildfire, leadership for emergency management is assumed and maintained by local government officials. However, due to differences between the structures of the many state, federal, and other response agencies involved in response and recovery efforts, a standardized system for communication, command, and control is required.
This is where Incident Command System (ICS) comes in and which Evans Kuo works within on a near daily basis. Evans has served on Great Basin Incident Management Teams for the last XX years, most recently serving as Incident Commander on XXX . Last year he was involved in the Pole Creek Fire in Utah. Through this system Evans works cooperatively with multiple agencies, both within and outside of government, to organize and coordinate response activities without compromising the decision-making authority of local command. Evans position ensures that the most pressing needs are met, and that precious resources are used without duplication or waste.
This presentation will draw on Evans' many years of working experience in Fire Operations for the US Forest Service to explain approaches to wildland fire management. This will include explaining wildfire management teams, coordination during and after fires, and fire assessment teams. The presentation will identify ways that local and state organizations can coordinate with federal teams to improve communications and reduce risk and conflicts during and after a fire.

Speakers
EK

Evans Kuo

US Forest Service
Evans Kuo is a Type 1 incident commander with the U.S. Forest Service. As the top boss of many wildland blazes, his job is to be in control of all aspects of these complicated struggles and his strategy is simple, but serious. "Our first and foremost goal is what we call life first... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 9:00am - 9:45am MDT
Opera House

9:00am MDT

Guest Program Craft Activity
Make crafts to donate to Festival of Trees Come together to assemble crafts to donate to the Festival of Trees. This year we will be making lighted lantern shadow boxes with winter scenes.

Thursday October 10, 2019 9:00am - Friday October 11, 2019 10:45am MDT
Limelight Promenade

9:45am MDT

Bedrock Aquifer Enhancement
Replacing a 200 foot deep well with a 2,500 foot deep well brings multiple challenges, especially in identifying underlying geologic structures, formation characteristics and aquifer properties. The initial target depth of the replacement well was 2,000 feet. However, due to the complex geology (folding), the depth was extended to 2,500 feet and penetration in the target aquifer was significantly reduced. The well was constructed, developed and tested with less than optimal results. Specialized industry techniques were utilized to enhance the yield in the aquifer. Equipping the well also created challenges due to a deep pump setting (1,900+ ft), specialized pumping equipment and apparatuses, elevated head pressures and a specialized startup procedure.

Speakers
CD

Christopher DeKorver

Hydrogeologist, Bowen Collins & Associates
Chris DeKorver was born and raised in Salt Lake City, Utah. Chris is a graduate from the University of Utah in Geological Engineering. He has focused on hydrogeology and groundwater resources by starting his career in the California Central Valley and returning to Salt Lake City over... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am MDT
Sawtooth

9:45am MDT

Building Partnerships with Agriculture to Protect Source Waters
On June 26, 2019, the Natural Resources Conservation Service announced it is considering new applications for the National Water Quality Initiative’s Source Water Protection Area program. This component of NWQI began in FY2019 as a pilot program and is continuing this year, and likely into the foreseeable future. In 2018, NWQI deployed over $30 million in assistance nationally.
NWQI Source Water Protection Area projects focus on addressing specific agriculturally related source water protection needs by channeling NRCS conservation program funding to agricultural producers in identified watersheds to implement practices that help to protect sources of drinking water.
In order to assure the successful deployment of these funds to protect source waters, utilities need to come to the table locally with NRCS state technical committees and local work groups to help discuss and prioritize source water protection needs. Come to this presentation to learn about how to work with NRCS and what opportunities are out there for you to support your source water protection programs.

Speakers
SD

Sarah Dominick

Engineer, Hazen and Sawyer
Sarah Dominick is a Senior Associate at Hazen and Sawyer. In her work, she provides planning expertise to utilities throughout the country. Ms. Dominick possesses real-world experience and knowledge of water utility operations, treatment, water resources, and Western water policy... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am MDT
Continental

9:45am MDT

Innovative New Financing Alternatives for Idaho and Utah
As communities in Utah and Idaho are growing rapidly, many cities and districts must determine the best way to pay for capital projects needed for growth, repair and replacement, and regulatory needs. Many funding options are available to help pay for necessary projects including cash and impact/connection fee funding, traditional debt financing, and other programs (DEQ, WIFIA, USDA, Idaho Bond Bank, CIB), judicial confirmation, etc. This presentation will help sort out the types of funding that may be available for projects and the best ways to develop a capital funding plan to gain support from residents, councils, and boards.

Speakers
avatar for Marcus Keller

Marcus Keller

Vice President Zions Public Finance, Inc., Zions Public Finance Inc.
Mr. Keller joined Zions in Salt Lake City in 2014. Since joining Zions, he has worked on general obligation bonds, revenue bonds, short term notes, lease revenue bonds, local improvement district special assessment bonds, and special assessment administration. Mr. Keller earned a... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am MDT
Columbine

9:45am MDT

Responding to Customer's Drinking Water Quality Concerns: A Risk Mitigation In Action
The City of Mapleton, UT has received customer complaints over the years pertaining to drinking water taste, odor and color. As the City has continued to grow, water quality concerns have arisen as well pumping durations have increased. The City and J-U-B Engineers conducted a water quality assessment, characterizing risk and developing strategies to mitigate water quality risks.
A water sampling plan was developed at strategic locations in the distribution system. The analysis of the results focused first on source water chemistry and then on distribution system dynamics. The AWWA M68 manual was the guiding document through the assessment.
Being able to correlate customer complaints to operational conditions began to tell a story that suggests there is potential for differing source chemistry that impact taste, odor and color. There was no one single water quality parameter that can be attributed to customer complaints. Rather, awareness of source water interaction and how that source moves through the water distribution system provided a complete story. Data management and operations and maintenance strategies were recommended as the highest value solutions. The governing objective going forward is to proactively address water quality risk regarding customer confidence, that manifests in taste, odor and color concerns.

Speakers
avatar for Delmas Johnson

Delmas Johnson

Sr. Project Manager/Client Service Manager, J-U-B Engineers, Inc.
Delmas W. Johnson has 28 years of experience in the water industry as a consultant/engineer and water system/asset manager; currently a Sr. Project Manager with J-U-B Engineers. Delmas enjoys working with people in a collaborative environment, receiving/adding value with those he... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am MDT
Boiler Room

9:45am MDT

South Jordan's DPR Demonstration Project: A Critical First Step Towards Direct Potable Reuse in Utah
Treating wastewater effluent to meet drinking water standards for direct distribution to the public (direct potable reuse, DPR) is growing in the US. The driving forces for DPR include the increased value of water, finite water supply, sustained droughts, and population growth. The current challenges associated with DPR are not in the treatment but in the public outreach and regulatory acceptance.
The City of South Jordan is pursuing DPR as a reliable, high-quality, drought-tolerant supply to help meet potable demands of their future customers. The first step for South Jordan's DPR journey is a 20-gpm demonstration facility located at the Jordan Basin Water Reclamation Facility. This facility will provide critical process performance data for the proposed, non-RO treatment train. More importantly, it will be a showcase facility available for public tours and tasting, and will provide years of operational confidence to City officials, regulators, and the public.
We will present case studies of existing DPR facilities in other states, discuss South Jordan's proposed process train and how it is impacted by the upstream wastewater treatment process, the DPR demonstration facility, and an overview of the capital and O&M costs of a future full scale facility.

Speakers
avatar for Alan Domonoske

Alan Domonoske

Vice President, Carollo Engineers
I am a Vice President with Carollo Engineers with an M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering and a B.A. in Biochemistry and Cell Biology. I am a licensed professional engineer and a former Certified Grade IV Water Treatment Plant Operator. I have more than 26 years of experience... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am MDT
Opera House

10:15am MDT

Achieving Enhanced Water Quality with a New 12.5 MG Baffled Reservoir
How do you design and construct a new finished water reservoir to enhance water quality for the largest water treatment plant in Utah, while still maintaining service to customers? Despite the fact that the Jordan Valley Water Treatment Plant capacity has more than quadrupled from 42 MGD to 180 MGD over the last four decades, the plant has always operated with a meager 8 MG of onsite storage capacity. The District identified a need for additional storage to solve these problems and retained Bowen, Collins & Associates to provide engineering services for the project. The project presented a number of challenges requiring innovative solutions, including:
1. CFD Modeling to Optimize Baffle Configuration: Development of computational fluid dynamics models in the design phase paid dividends by allowing us optimize hydraulic efficiency of the new reservoir. This efficiency is key in achieving the primary project goal to improve water quality by reducing the potential for formation of disinfection byproducts.
2. New Valve Technology: We leveraged new advances in butterfly valve technology to replace leaking and inoperable slide gates with more reliable double-offset butterfly valves that have much-improved sealing and operation characteristics.
3. Maintaining Service During Construction: In response to unanticipated changes in water demand during construction, the team worked together to modify construction sequencing and meet both supply and construction goals.
The new reservoir has been in service for more than a year now and the District is gratified with the improved flexibility and enhanced water quality that it provides.

Speakers
DM

David McLean

Senior Engineer and Project Manager, Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District
David McLean is a Senior Engineer and Project Manager with Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District. He has been with the District 18 years and specializes in treatment and pump station projects. He has a BS degree in Mechanical Engineering and an MS Degree in Civil Engineering. He... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am MDT
Boiler Room

10:15am MDT

Southwest Aqueduct Reach 1 - Overcoming Design and Construction Challenges
The Design and Construction of Southwest Aqueduct Reach 1 required close coordination between the owner, engineer and contractor to provide JVWCD with additional raw water supply capacity for the JVWTP and to provide redundancy to the Jordan Aqueduct. The project includes over 11,000 LF of 66-inch WSP pipe for the new Southwest Aqueduct and segments of new 78-inch to replace existing raw water supply pipelines. Due to the significant number of connections and modifications necessary at existing large diameter water infrastructure sites, a significant portion of the project was completed under a tight construction schedule during a winter shutdown of the Jordan Aqueduct. The pipeline was constructed in phases to allow portions of key water control facilities to be used prior to full project completion. The project includes four large control vault structures utilizing 66-inch diameter double offset butterfly valves, a 66-inch standpipe, two 36-inch plunger valves for flow control, and an impressed current cathodic protection system. Innovative modifications to the Jordan Narrows pump station were completed to avoid the need for a separate flow control facility and internal pipe header isolation was installed underneath the existing pump station to limit the required number of large valves needed for the project.

Speakers
avatar for Cristina Nelson

Cristina Nelson

Project Manager, Bowen Collins & Associates
Bowen, Collins & Associates


Thursday October 10, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am MDT
Sawtooth

10:15am MDT

Utah's Regional Water Conservation Goals
(In this presentation you will get answers to these important questions:
1.    Why are regional water conservation goals being developed?
2.    How many regions are there and what are the boundaries for each region? What are the goals in each region?
3.    What is required to meet the regional goal by 2030?
4.    Who contributed to the development of the regional water conservation goals?
5.    How was the regional goal model developed?
6.    What went into the model?blank)

Speakers
avatar for Steve Jones

Steve Jones

Vice President, Hansen Allen & Luce
Mr. Jones is a Vice President at Hansen, Allen & Luce. He has more than 20 years of experience in the planning and design of gravity and pressurized drinking and secondary water systems, storm drain systems, sanitary sewer systems. He has extensive experience in Utah water rights... Read More →
avatar for Keith Larson

Keith Larson

Project Manager, Bowen Collins & Associates
Keith Larson is a principal at Bowen Collins & Associates. He has received degrees from both the University of Utah and the University of California. He specializes in design, master planning, and asset management of water utilities. An essential component of all his water master... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am MDT
Continental

10:15am MDT

Water Reuse; the New AWWA Standard
Water reuse is becoming an increasingly vital aspect of water management in the western states. This presentation will cover the basics of water reuse, including the technology and the policy behind it, and how the AWWA’s recently released national standard fits in.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Hartvigsen

Michael Hartvigsen

Civil Engineer, Epic Engineering, P.C.
Michael has a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Brigham Young University and has eight years of engineering experience in the water industry with the U.S. Forest Service and Epic Engineering. Michael has designed and managed the construction of numerous water pipelines, pump stations... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am MDT
Opera House

10:15am MDT

Will your organization be prepared for a major earthquake?
It's easy to forget that in Utah we live in earthquake country. This presentation will outline the practical steps water utilities can take to prepare for a seismic event. We will evaluate best practices to better respond to an event from an operational standpoint, including managing the safety and health of employees during and after an event.

We will also discuss the role of insurance and other funding resources, including FEMA and internal funds and how optimizing the use these resources can help an organization be more resilient to recover from a seismic event.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Child

Brian Child

Account Executive, Olympus Insurance
Brian Child has been an Account Executive with Olympus Insurance for the past 15 years.  Brian works with hundreds of public sector and utility organizations throughout the western US.  Brian works with clients to develop effective risk management and insurance programs and is involved... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am MDT
Columbine

10:45am MDT

11:30am MDT

11:30am MDT

Brianhead Fire Flood Mitigation within Parowan City, Utah
On June 17, 2017 the Brian Head fire started within the mountains to the south and east of Parowan City and burned over 71,600 acres (112 square miles), with over 25,000 acres (39.4 square miles) of the burned area falling within the watershed above Parowan City. Burning of the ground cover significantly increases the runoff potential of the watershed and the potential for flooding debris flows. After the fire was extinguish, multiple summer rain events caused significant flooding and associated damage at the Parowan City’s Forebay Pond and within the City, particularly between 100 West and 600 West.
BC&A worked with Iron County, Parowan City, and the NRCS to design repairs and flood mitigation recommendations along Parowan Creek. The major project features included:
• Construction of a new Forebay Dam using a chimney drain embankment to satisfy NRCS Pond design requirements related to stability and seepage control. The existing dam was flown using drone technology to obtain aerial imagery and topography. This information was input into a three-dimensional Civil 3D model to develop the proposed design of the Forebay Dam. This model was then given to the Contractor to upload in their construction equipment to build the project.
• The outlet works of the Parowan Forebay Holding Pond were reconstructed.
• Erosion of Parowan Creek adjacent to the Forebay Dam was mitigated by providing erosion protection measures, including a grouted riprap channel that needed to withstand maximum velocities upward of 17 feet per second (fps).
• Two existing drop structures at 600 West and 200 West were repaired and reinforced with grouted riprap to prevent future headcutting during a large flood event.
• Sections of Parowan Creek were reinforced with riprap. Material excavated from the channel was placed on the channel banks to provide additional flood capacity and the channel banks were revegetated to help prevent minor erosion.
• Sediment was excavated from the channel to provide more flood conveyance capacity and help prevent flooding of downstream residential homes.
The project was designed, including environmental permitting, in about a three-month time period and bid in the spring of 2018. Construction took place from about May 2018 to September 2018 and the project was completed about a year after BC&A was contracted to complete the work.

Speakers
TO

Todd Olsen

Project Manager, Bowen Collins & Associates
Todd Olsen works for Bowen Collins & Associated working out of their St. George, Utah office and has over 15 year of experience in the planning, design and construction of large water, wastewater, stormwater, and flood control/irrigation projects and facilities. Todd has served as... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm MDT
Continental

11:30am MDT

Fluoridation Facilities - Design and Operation Considerations & Lessons Learned
Due to the chemicals stored and injected at fluoridation facilities and the critical need of preventing fluoride overfeed in drinking water systems, special considerations must be included when designing, operating or inspecting fluoridation facilities. This presentation will cover Utah's design and construction requirements and important lessons learned from past incidents related to fluoridation facilities.

Speakers
avatar for Ying-Ying Macauley

Ying-Ying Macauley

Assistant Director, Utah Division of Drinking Water
Ying-Ying Macauley is the assistant director of Division of Drinking Water in Utah Department of Environmental Quality. Ying-Ying received a master degree from University of Utah with emphasis in environmental engineering. She is a registered professional engineer with 24 years of... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm MDT
Opera House

11:30am MDT

THMs after the Fire: Water storage tanks a smart and active agent in the management and improvement of water quality
Elevated trihalomethane (THM) levels are the most common violations of the Stage 2 DBP Rule in the United States. Municipalities across the country have employed a variety of methods to reduce THM formation rates. Utilities can incur costly and lengthy treatment plant upgrades, which often provide inadequate reduction levels in distribution networks due to continued THM formation at points distant from treatment plants.
Active tank mixing, in-tank aeration, and head-space ventilation systems are three tools that through thoughtful combination, can yield meaningful reductions in distribution system THM levels. These technologies make water storage tanks a smart and active agent in the management and improvement of water quality instead of a passive vessel holding water of uncertain quality.
In the past, THM reduction literature focused on the extensive deployment of capital equipment that obligated utilities to even greater lifetime energy consumption costs. Today, with a decade of compliance data from a variety of different system configurations, manufacturers can dramatically lower initial capital costs and significantly reduce energy costs while guaranteeing compliance.
A number of case studies depicting a variety of equipment options as well as process control options that represent the current state-of-the-art will be profiled to underscore the use of water reservoirs to help manage distribution network THM levels.

Speakers
JR

Jeff Rhodes

Senior Product Manager, THM Removal System, UGSi Solutions, Inc.
Ethan Brooke Senior Product Manager, THM Removal System, PSI Water Technologies, Inc. Ethan Brooke is an internationally recognized expert on aeration technologies for trihalomethane (THM) removal. His master’s thesis on THM aeration was published in the Journal American Water... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm MDT
Boiler Room

11:30am MDT

Tools to Keep a CIP Relevant Amidst Continual Change
An effective master plan is a valuable resource for a water utility in day-to-day decisions, annual budgeting, and stakeholder/customer engagement. Unfortunately, many master plans sit gathering dust on a shelf and are rarely used. One cause: the challenge of keeping the master plan current amidst changing conditions. A water master plan includes a Capital Improvement Program (CIP) listing improvements identified through the evaluation of existing and future conditions. As time progresses these conditions; such as growth projections, supply availability, system degradation, neighboring utility/infrastructure plans, etc.; change from the estimates used in the evaluations. As a result, static master planning reports loose relevance and are at risk of becoming obsolete. Effective documentation of the CIP projects included in the master plan leads to a different outcome. This presentation summarizes the type of information that should be documented for each CIP project and the use of platforms for that documentation which facilitate continual updates as conditions change. An overview of Weber Basin Water Conservancy District’s interactive CIP tool will be provided to illustrate how these methods help with presenting CIP information to board members, collaboration with other stakeholders, and eventual implementation of the most cost-effective projects.

Speakers
JG

Jack Grayson

Staff Engineer, Brown and Caldwell
Jack Grayson is a Civil Engineer-in-training with more than 5 years of experience with water modeling software. He has been primarily involved with developing master plans for municipal water systems using model evaluations. He has a B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm MDT
Columbine

11:30am MDT

Upgrading a Microfloc Plant to Membranes
This presentation will discuss the design, construction and operation of the new Bountiful Water Treatment Plant. Prior to upgrades the City had been operating a Neptune Microfloc filtration system for the past 30 years. The new 2 mgd (1400 gpm firm capacity) facility uses ultrafiltration membranes. In order to preserve the existing clear well, the existing structure was refurbished and a new addition was added. Other unique aspects of this project include: utilizing the CMGC process to facilitate a tight schedule, permitting and approvals required by the USFS, pre-design procurement of the membranes, and a tight construction footprint among others.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Osborn

Christina Osborn

Project Manager, J-U-B Engineers
Ms. Osborn is a Project Manager and project engineer in J-U-B Engineer’s Salt Lake City office where she has focused on water, wastewater, and reclaimed water planning and design. Ms. Osborn has worked at J-U-B for more than 16 years. Prior to working at J-U-B Ms. Osborn served... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm MDT
Sawtooth

11:30am MDT

Guest Program Craft Activity
Guest Craft Activity - Make a Gift for Yourself Build a wooden letterboard for yourself to display personal sayings and quotes.

Thursday October 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:30pm MDT
Limelight Promenade

12:00pm MDT

Idaho Source Water Protection Collaborative: Its Your Drinking Water. Lets Protect It.
In Idaho there are approximately 2,000 public water systems providing water to almost 1.3 million people. Clean drinking water is vital to the physical and economic health of those communities, and can be achieved through a multi-barrier approach by public water systems, local government, regulators, and the general public from source water protection through distribution. Source water is the raw, untreated supply of surface and ground water used for current or potential future drinking water. Source water protection is a proactive, front-line defense to safeguard, maintain, or improve the quality of drinking water sources and their contributing areas. It involves a coordinated approach among stakeholders to develop strategies that prevent, minimize, or control potential sources of contamination and enhance water quality ultimately reducing public health risks and operating costs.

The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) Source Water Protection Program plays a key role in this multi-barrier approach by helping communities and public water systems to protect drinking water at the source. DEQ develops source water assessment reports and provides them to the public through an online tool, identifies and promotes the implementation of best management practices to address potential sources of contamination, raises public awareness, encourages public involvement, and collaborates with many partners through the Idaho Source Water Collaborative.

Speakers
JH

Joanna Hahn

Idaho DEQ
Joanna Hahn is a Scientist with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). Since 2007 she has worked at DEQ in the Pollution Prevention Program, Waste and Remediation Division, and Water Quality Division. For the last eight years she has worked in DEQ’s Ground Water Bureau... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm MDT
Continental

12:00pm MDT

PFAS Water Treatment Study: Comparison of GAC to Single-Pass Ion Exchange
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS, emerging contaminants of concern) have been detected in the water of multiple culinary water supply wells serving a confidential client. The wells are down gradient of a regional airport, where aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) containing PFAS was used in firefighting exercises. In 2017, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) issued new health based guidance values for PFAS that were lower than levels in many of the supply wells. The client has proactively blended water from several wells to supply water that is compliant with the new guidance while actively pursuing options to address PFAS in the water supply.

Steps taken to secure a PFAS free supply for the near and long term, include completing a water treatment study for PFAS that compared three different treatment media. The test included an accelerated column test (ACT) with granular activated carbon (GAC) and a single-pass ion exchange pilot test that simultaneously evaluated two different ion exchange (IX) resins. The data collected resulted in the ability to compare the three different types of treatment media and their effectiveness in removal of PFAS from drinking water. This presentation will provide detailed results of the ACT and pilot test.

Speakers
KW

Katie Wolohan

Environmental Engineer (PE), Barr Engineering Company
Katie Wolohan has more than seven years of environmental consulting experience and assists clients with industrial and municipal water and wastewater treatment, water reuse, and environmental compliance and permitting. She has assisted with the evaluation, design, and implementation... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm MDT
Boiler Room

12:00pm MDT

Unlocking Potential Treatment Capacity and Reducing Capital Cost
Aging treatment plants and changing raw water quality threaten the resiliency of the drinking water supply of many utilities. For existing WTPs, custom solutions developed with strong collaboration with plant staff are required to replace obsolete facilities and help utilities prepare for the future while minimizing capital costs and related project risk.

The Soldier Canyon Filter Plant (SCFP) operated by the Soldier Canyon Water Treatment Authority was constructed in 1962 as a direct filtration plant in Fort Collins, Colorado. Upgrades since that time include flocculation and sedimentation basins, additional filters, and solids handling systems. The Authority was considering a $48 million capital program to expand the plant to 60 mgd, including adding six new filters. By creatively demonstrating high filtration rates to state regulators, project costs have been reduced to approximately $38 million. New work includes installing new pretreatment trains, new chemical systems, correcting hydraulic deficiencies, improving the plant’s electrical infrastructure, and providing a robust new disinfection process.

This presentation will discuss key design considerations of creative plant upgrades for existing WTPs. Strategies employed at the SCFP will be featured, including a pilot and full scale demonstration test to gain 15 mgd greater capacity without expanding or adding new filters.

Speakers
MP

Michelle Peters

Environmental Engineer, Stantec
Michelle Peters is a process engineer with Stantec in Denver, Colorado. She has a bachelor’s degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Berkeley, a master’s degree from the Colorado School of Mines, and is a licensed engineer in Colorado and Nevada. She is... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm MDT
Sawtooth

12:00pm MDT

What's Next for PFAS and Gen-X?
The results of UCMR-3 showed PFAS being found coast to coast in groundwater and some surface waters, and that it was often linked to industrial manufacturing or Class B firefighting foam usage. Aggressive provisional health advisories have been set by EPA for PFOA and PFOS, and a new action plan was released in February 2019. There has been a flurry of activity by individual states and industry to help better inform the public and find better technologies to handle this new issue. The presentation will give an update about some of the new/modified treatment technologies being employed for PFAS, present lessons learned from installed projects, and give an update about the regulatory environment for PFAS.

Speakers
AN

Andrew Nishihara

Senior Civil Engineer, Stantec Consulting Services, Inc.
Andrew has been working with Stantec for over 11 years on a variety of different water resources, treatment, and conveyance projects that have spanned planning through construction. He is currently involved in Stantec's PFAS taskforce and has been working on treatment projects for... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm MDT
Opera House

12:00pm MDT

When Water Delivery Fails
One of the greatest challenges of water organizations is a failure in the delivery of water. Failure may occur from line breaks, process failure or contamination, which may rise from natural events or man created negligence. In recent years legal liability has also emerged from inverse condemnation or the diminished value of land adjacent to our facilities. In this session we’ll cover these area and the best approaches for handling the profound risks of water organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Darrell Child

Darrell Child

Executive Vice President, Olympus Insurance Agency
Darrell Child leads the Public Sector Practice at Olympus Insurance.  He has over 30 years of experience working with parks and recreation organizations to manage risk and design effective insurance programs.  Darrell holds two Bachelors degrees and a Masters degree from the University... Read More →


Thursday October 10, 2019 12:00pm - 12:30pm MDT
Columbine

1:30pm MDT

Historical Bus Tour of Ketchum and Sun Valley
Historical Bus Tour of Ketchum and Sun Valley
Thursday, October 10th
1:30 to 4:30 pm, Meet in the Continental Room

Join your fellow conference attendees in a historical bus tour of Ketchum and Sun Valley
We will meet in the Continental Room at 1:30 PM on Thursday, October 10th to get a short introduction from our tour guides, longtime locals, Jim and Wendy Jaquet. Jim and Wendy have resided in Ketchum-Sun Valley since 1977 when they moved here because of their love of the valley.  Jim was the Ketchum City Administrator for 25 years, and is an avid baseball fan.  Wendy, who is passionate about politics and her community welcomed visitors from around the world as the Director of the Sun Valley-Ketchum Chamber for 13 years before serving in the Idaho State Legislature for 18 years. 
Jim and Wendy have many stories and insights to share regarding this very special place they call home. 
 
Historical sites may include the restaurant where Ernest Hemingway had his last supper; the home of Horace Lewis, who ran the iconic ore wagons up and down the steep Trail Creek Road; and the site of the original Sun Valley rodeo.
 
Cost:  $35 Includes transportation and guided tour.  Attendees will be provided with snacks, a bottle of water, and a drawstring backpack to carry the items.  $10 of the ticket price will be donated to the Intermountain Section’s Scholarship Fund.

Purchase Tickets at https://www.ims-awwa.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=14850159



Thursday October 10, 2019 1:30pm - 4:30pm MDT
Continental

1:30pm MDT

Taylor Canyon Loop Group Hike
Taylor Canyon Loop Group Hike, Moderate difficulty.
Purchase Tickets at https://www.ims-awwa.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=14047560
4.4 mile loop with Great views!Join your fellow conference attendees in a moderate hike in the Wood River Valley.

Cost: $35 Includes snacks, a bottle of water, and a drawstring backpack to carry the items. $10 will be donated to the Intermountain Section’s Scholarship Fund.
Meet in Columbine Room to travel together

Thursday October 10, 2019 1:30pm - 4:30pm MDT
Columbine

1:30pm MDT

 
Friday, October 11
 

8:00am MDT

Membership Breakfast (All are welcome)
Come for breakfast and hear about all of the Intermountain Section AWWA's activities, both past and future

Friday October 11, 2019 8:00am - 9:30am MDT
Limelight Ballroom B

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

8:00am MDT

Drawing on Experience to Benefit Water For People
Purchase Tickets to have an opportunity to win an experience - See Registration or online to purchase tickets.

5 Tickets for $20 - https://www.ims-awwa.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=14781468
Single Ticket $5 - https://www.ims-awwa.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=14781510

Friday October 11, 2019 8:00am - Saturday October 12, 2019 11:30am MDT
Limelight Promenade

9:00am MDT

Guest Program Breakfast
Breakfast with your friends
Meet at Gretchen’s in the Sun Valley Lodge to enjoy a leisurely breakfast with friends, old and new.

Friday October 11, 2019 9:00am - 10:00am MDT
Gretchen's in The Lodge

9:30am MDT

9:30am MDT

City of West Jordan SCADA Master Plan & Implementation
The City of West Jordan has implemented a system wide replacement of their Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system in a three phased approach. Phase I consisted of developing a master plan that captured the City’s vision, defined the approach, identified features and capabilities of the City’s existing SCADA system, outlined and planned near-term improvements, and the analysis and selection of a new Human Interface Software (HMI). Phase II included the HMI architecture design, development of control system standards, and design of the remote site controls and telemetry to monitor and control reservoirs, valves, meters, and pumps within the City’s water system. During Phase II construction documents were created for the replacement of the SCADA system, the project was bid, and a contractor was selected. In Phase III the selected contractor is constructing and installing the SCADA system control panels and the HMI software is being programmed to control the remote facility sites. The SCADA system components at each facility site will be replaced over the next 6 months. The new system will be commissioned in phases during this time, with project completion anticipated in November of 2019.

Speakers
SB

Steven Brenchley

Principal Engineer, Brown and Caldwell
Steve Brenchley is a licensed Civil Engineer with more than 20 years of experience in planning, designing, and managing water and civil infrastructure projects. His expertise focuses on, planning, designing, managing and delivering water infrastructure projects.


Friday October 11, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am MDT
Sage

9:30am MDT

Designing and Conducting a Successful Corrosion Coupon Study
Corrosion coupons are a simple, cost-effective research tool for measuring the corrosive properties of water. Planning for a successful corrosion coupon study requires careful consideration of what parameters the corrosion study will include. Some of the parameters include apparatus design, plumbing conditions, flow, coupon alloys, study duration, and analyses at the conclusion of the study. While corrosion coupon studies are well established in the water industry, the nuances of experimental design and execution are not well established. In this talk, we will discuss the corrosion coupon studies conducted by Central Utah Water Conservancy District and Jordan Valley Water Conservancy Districts and some of the lessons that we have learned during the design, experimental and analytical phases of these studies.

Speakers
EC

Erik Cram

Lab Manager, Central Utah Water Conservancy District
Erik D. Cram, Ph.D. is new to the water industry but has been conducting research for 15 years. In High School and early college years, Erik worked for a small biotech company in American Fork, Utah where his research was used for product patents. Erik received his Bachelor of Science... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am MDT
Boiler Room

9:30am MDT

How Do I Comply with AWIA of 2018 Risk & Resilience Requirements
This presentation will provide Water Utilities with the latest information on the America’s Water Infrastructure Act (AWIA) of 2018 specifically for Section 2013 Community Water System Risk and Resilience requirements. EPA and AWWA are working on guidance and technical assistance for AWIA Compliance to provide to Water Utilities from March through October 2019. This will include items such as a compliance fact sheet, technical assistance primer, baseline threat information document, tools, webinars, guidance to small water systems, and videos. This presentation will provide a summary of what is available and where to access and how to use the information, where appropriate. The current industry standards and methods (i.e., J100-10, G430-14, G440-17, etc.) for performing an All Hazards Risk and Resilience Assessment (RRA) and the Emergency Response Plan (ERP) development/update per the AWIA requirements will also be covered. Examples of what water utilities are doing to meet the AWIA requirements will be presented for as many different size utilities (Large, Medium, and Small) as possible. The examples will also include where possible different utility perspectives of those that have recently updated their 2003 to 2004 Security Vulnerability Assessments (SVAs) required by the 2002 Bioterrorism Act with an All Hazard Vulnerability Assessment using J100-10 to those that have not updated their original SVAs and/or ERPs.

Speakers
BE

Bryon Elwell

President, ELWELL Consulting Group
Mr. Elwell is President and Senior Consultant in Risk Management & Emergency Planning for ELWELL Consulting Group. He is a licensed professional engineer with Bachelors & Masters Degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of Utah. He is a licensed Instructor of Sandia's RAM-W... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am MDT
Opera House

9:30am MDT

How to Save Time & Money: Creating Standard Plans to Streamline the Plan Approval Process
Standard plans and specifications can be a vital tool to ensure your infrastructure is built according to your requirements. Granger-Hunter Improvement District uses standards to ensure all contractors, including their own construction crews (sometimes not willingly), are held to the same requirements. This can be especially useful when rejecting sub-standard work or communicating expectations up-front with a contractor before they begin construction.
In addition, Utah Rule R309-500-7 allows public water systems with approved standard installation drawings and specifications to install and operate new water transmission and distribution pipelines (up to a certain size) without obtaining plan approval and without obtaining an operating permit. This can be especially useful if you don’t want to get fined for after-the-fact plan approvals or operating permits. In this session, we will discuss how GHID developed its standards and the process the Utah Division of Drinking Water used to review them.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Marti

Todd Marti

Engineer, Granger Hunter Improvement District
Todd is the Director of Engineering for the Granger-Hunter Improvement District. His educational background includes a B.S. (UofU) and M.S. (UNM) in Civil Engineering, and an MPA from the U because he still doesn't know what he wants to be if he grows up. He is married with two boys... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am MDT
Sawtooth

9:30am MDT

Water Loss Validation: A new standard of practice
A new standard of practice has been established for water audit validation, as a result of Water Research Foundation Project #4639A (2016) and the regulatory adoption of validation requirements in three U.S. states since 2015. The result is a standardized method for conducting a summary level validation review for the AWWA water audit, known as a Level 1 validation. States who have adopted water audit validation as a requirement have naturally evolved to establish a validator certification program. The validator certification programs empower those in each state to conduct validations, providing a sustainable path for the long-term water over state-funded validation. This presentation will include key points of the WRF 4639 validation methodology, states with mandated water audit validation and outcomes of the Georgia and California validation certification programs to date.

Speakers
SC

Steve Cavanaugh

CEO, President, Cavanaugh & Associates, P.A.
As President and Chief Innovation Officer of Cavanaugh & Associates, P.A., Steve Cavanaugh is a creative visionary with an unshakable dedication to environmental stewardship and preservation, which has led him to work with public and private sectors, both nationally and internationally... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am MDT
Continental

10:00am MDT

10:00am MDT

Construction Cost Escalation, Labor Shortages, Schedule Creep What are we to do?
The decade from 2016-2026 will see a significant investment in infrastructure in the State of Utah. Projects like the airport expansion and prison relocation all grab headlines as high profile projects. However, the impacts are far greater than just those high profile projects. What does this mean for other infrastructure projects in the state such as pipelines, lift stations, treatment plants etc.? What is the approach from an Owners, Engineers and Contractors perspective on the growing labor shortage, cost escalation, longer lead times on materials etc. This presentation will seek to share current insight on the construction market including labor shortage, schedule concerns, cost escalation, bidding climate, strategies to address these issues and also how Owners, Engineers and Contractors can work more closely together to help solve these problems as a team. The goal is to have a panel made up of at least one Owner, Engineer and Contractor to create an environment where productive and open conversations can be had in a forum type setting. Come join us as we talk about these challenges facing local districts and communities in the Intermountain Region.

Speakers
GP

Glen Perry

Chief Operating Officer, COP Construction
Glen is currently Chief Operating Officer for COP Construction LLC located in Billings Montana, Salt Lake City Utah and Sheridan WY. Glen has over 25 years’ experience in different levels of management. Glen’s experience has been in a variety of areas from heavy site-work... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am MDT
Sawtooth

10:00am MDT

Does your Strategic Plan allow for successful crisis communication?
The goal of this session is to help identify the key components of an organization that must be present in order for that organization to successfully communicate during a crisis.

Most attending this conference work on complex water systems that affect thousands of people and involve many stakeholders. With such large systems, anything could go wrong, break, or cause significant impact to those they serve on any given day. If something does happen that requires quick and immediate action from the water supplier, what is the best approach to communicating with those being impacted? Who communicates with the media? How do you keep your elected officials informed? How might you build trust in these times rather than lose it? What would that mean for you and your organization?

It is impossible to plan for and have specific action plans for every potential risk a water supplier may face. In this session, we’ll explore the need to step back and ask, does our strategic plan allow for successful crisis communication? The root to successful crisis communication is a strategic plan that provides guidance on the organization’s identify through a shared understanding of the organization’s values. Organizations that are highly successful at crisis communication create an unbreakable link between the organization’s mission and its day-to-day activities.

Speakers
JK

Josh King

Senior Project Manager, The Langdon Group
Josh is a collaborative professional with a keen understanding of the theory and practice of strategic communication, negotiation, mediation, facilitation, political dialogue, and dispute systems design. His experience includes working in corporate, academic, and governmental settings... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am MDT
Opera House

10:00am MDT

Leveraging technology to increase project delivery, accountability and transparency.
In 2016, the Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities (DPU) identified the need to increase the project delivery capacity of the organization without significantly increasing the number of DPU staff or operating costs. DPU retained Jacobs/CH2M Hill Engineering to provide Program Management Services to expedite the delivery through staff augmentation, process improvements, and program management systems implementation.
To accelerate project delivery and bring increased visibility, and tracking, DPU has automated key project delivery business processes (e.g. Capital Planning, Consultant Invoices, Submittals, and RFIs). In addition to the process automation, project management practices, policies and other tools have been improved to meet the increased project delivery capacity of the organization.
MS-SharePoint is used as the overarching system for managing all project documents and associated business process information. Each capital project has its own site where the automation is performed, logs are monitored, and all project documentation is stored. Each site is utilized by DPU staff, design consultants and construction contractors. The system also includes personalized pages for executives to manage the approvals for project related actions. Also, part of the system is the “Performance Portal”, integrated with Primavera 6, which tracks schedule and cost information for each of DPU’s projects.

Speakers
JB

Jason Brown

Chief Engineer, Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities
Jason Brown has over twenty years of professional engineering experience, first as a private consultant, and for the last eleven years in public service at the Salt Lake City Department of Public Utilities. As Chief Engineer he directs and coordinates all engineering and engineering-related... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am MDT
Sage

10:00am MDT

Optimizing Treatment to Mitigate Corrosion in the Distribution System
This presentation focuses on water quality characteristics affecting distribution system corrosion that are altered by water treatment processes. Oxidants used for iron/manganese removal and disinfection impact the oxidation/reduction potential, metal salt coagulants impact pH, lime softening chemicals impact pH and buffer capacity, and nanofiltration/reverse osmosis impact pH and dissolved solids. When these processes are optimized for their specific treatment objectives, the resulting water chemistry can impact corrosiveness. This presentation will describe these water chemistry impacts and outline treated water chemistry adjustments to mitigate corrosion impacts in the distribution system.

Speakers
DD

Delvin DeBoer

Special Projects Engineer, Advanced Engineering and Environmental Services (AE2S)
Dr. DeBoer has a BSCE and MS in Engineering from South Dakota State University and Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering from Iowa State University. Dr. DeBoer served on the Faculty in the Civil Engineering Department at SDSU for 31 years, and has been employed as a Special Projects... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am MDT
Boiler Room

10:00am MDT

Saratoga Springs Fixed Network Implementation
With the completion of a city-wide metering project for their pressurized irrigation system and the adoption of tiered rates to encourage water conservation, Saratoga was ready to take the next step, the implementation of a FIxed Network meter read system. This system will allow the City to continuously collect, manage and analyze detailed customer water use data for an unparalleled understanding of how our residents are using water, "our most precious resource".

Speakers
JL

Jeremy Lapin

Public Works DIrector, City of Saratoga Springs
Jeremy graduated from the University of Utah in 2004 and spent the first 5 years of his career in the private sector as a consultant designing and managing many types of civil engineering projects for municipalities, water districts, sewer districts, and both residential and commercial... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am MDT
Continental

10:30am MDT

3 Kings Water Treatment Plant: Maximizing Treatment Capability and Visual Appeal on a Constrained Site
Park City Municipal Corporation (PCMC) has been issued Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (UPDES) permits for the discharge of waters from Judge and Spiro Tunnels. PCMC entered into a Stipulated Compliance Order (SCO), concurrent with the issuance of the permits, which established schedules and certain terms and conditions for bringing the tunnel water metals discharges into compliance with the UPDES permits. The mine tunnel waters are currently used by PCMC (and other entities) for municipal drinking water, irrigation, and snowmaking.

In 2016, PCMC conducted pilot-scale testing to evaluate treatment alternatives for these water sources which formed the basis of design for the new 7.2 million gallons per day (mgd) 3Kings Water Treatment Plant in Park City. Based on the results, a treatment design approach was developed to address challenging water quality, optimize the facility layout to fit within a highly space constrained site, and balance the demand for visual appeal to the public.

This presentation will discuss the treatment technologies selected, process design approach, and how challenges were addressed while achieving architectural appeal.

Speakers
SM

Sean Menk

Principal Technologist, Jacobs
Sean Menk is a water treatment engineer with Jacobs in the Salt Lake City, Utah, office. Sean has been with Jacobs for over 7 years working on drinking water treatment projects.


Friday October 11, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am MDT
Boiler Room

10:30am MDT

Construction Contractor Pre-Qualifications
A challenge many owner’s face today is the successful construction of project budget and on time and budget by qualified and capable contractors. One way to help ensure the successful delivery of projects is for owners to prequalify contractors. By prequalifying contractors, not to be confused with disqualifying contractors, the owner selects contractors who are invited to submit bids on the project that they know have the man power, equipment, and technical expertise to successfully complete the project. The presentation will cover the prequalification process that we have used on projects in Utah, advantages/disadvantages of prequalifying contactors, and give suggestions for implementing a contractor prequalification process.

Speakers
GT

Greg Thomas

Project Manager/Client Services Manager, Stanley Consultants
Stanley Consultants


Friday October 11, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am MDT
Sawtooth

10:30am MDT

Most Numbers Start With 1: Validating Water Use Data with Benford's Law
Water use data are essential to managing water resources, but where most such data are self-reported or modeled, it is difficult to assess their accuracy. A curious, century-old observation known as Benford’s Law may help solve this problem. Benford's Law predicts the frequency of leading digits in numerical data. (About 30% of numbers start with 1, with decreasing frequencies for subsequent digits.) This research explores the conformity of water use data to Benford's Law and its potential applications to data validation. Potable water use data in the United States at system, county, and state levels were examined with statistical tests and visual inspection. Almost all were found to conform to Benford's Law. This finding could serve as a quality check on historical water use data as well as on projections and modeling results. Example applications are discussed.

Speakers
RS

Rob Sowby

Water Resources Engineer, Hansen, Allen & Luce, Inc.
Dedicated to advancing sustainable water supply, Dr. Rob Sowby is a water resources engineer at Hansen, Allen & Luce in Salt Lake City. His practice focuses on the planning, modeling, and energy management of public water systems. He has contributed to over 100 water projects throughout... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am MDT
Continental

10:30am MDT

Responding to Water System Emergencies
We all wish our water systems would run flawlessly now and forever, unfortunately we all know that is not reality. Water systems age and power failures, storms, floods and other disasters occur that result in disrupted water service. Contamination of our water supplies can result in failed tests. How we respond and communicate during these events can shape our careers and define the futures of our water systems. This presentation, which is informed by four separate emergency responses the presenter has helped clients recover from, will focus on:
- Immediate actions
- Short term actions
- Long term actions
- Regulatory obligations
- Communication: land lines, media, cell phones and social media
- Managing the message
- Recovery and rebuilding trust
- Finding funding
The emergencies informing this presentation include:
1. Loss of system pressure twice in a month resulting in boil orders
2. Contamination of the source water aquifer
3. Loss of supply, multiple wells "drying up" resulting in insufficient water to meet demands
4. Switching water supplies resulting in failed lead and copper tests (not Flint, Michigan)
There is a silver lining in these emergencies if managed correctly. In each case referenced in this abstract the road to recovery resulted in a much more robust and resilient water system.

Speakers
BL

Brian LeMon

Vice President Barr Engineering, Barr Engineering
Brian LeMon is a Vice President at Barr who has been helping permit, plan, and design water systems, in one way or another, for over 30 years. Brian has been active in AWWA for over two decades. Over 1.5 million people drink water from systems Brian has helped plan, permit, and or... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am MDT
Opera House

10:30am MDT

The Blue Plan-it® Operational Model Takes the Complexity out of Challenging Projects during Planning, Design, Training and Operations
Carollo's Blue Plan-it® tool helps utilities manage complex, interconnected water and wastewater infrastructure by evaluating and optimizing complex planning alternatives, confirming design concepts based on operational simulations, training operators, and optimizing operating facilities.

We used Blue Plan-it® to assist with Houston's Northeast Water Purification Plant (NEWPP) Expansion Project. This $1.75B project expands the existing 80-mgd NEWPP to 400 mgd using conventional treatment, intermediate ozone, biological filtration, and mechanical dewatering. The raw water source is challenging: major storm events produce rapidly changing conditions that can drop alkalinity to 10 mg/L, raise turbidity to 250 NTU, raise TOC to 20 mg/L, and require alum doses up to 220 mg/L. These challenges demand high reliability and operational flexibility, which also increases complexity.

This presentation will highlight how we used a Blue Plan-it® operational model to simplify the complexity for design confirmation and operator training by:
1. Demonstrating how plant operations respond to rapidly changing raw water quality, including impact of chemical dosing, finished water stability, and O&M cost
2. Highlighting the operational impacts (truck traffic) of high turbidity events and resulting high solids loading (700,000 lb/day)
3. Clarifying operational strategies to take advantage of built-in redundancy when different trains are out of service.

Speakers
avatar for Alan Domonoske

Alan Domonoske

Vice President, Carollo Engineers
I am a Vice President with Carollo Engineers with an M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering and a B.A. in Biochemistry and Cell Biology. I am a licensed professional engineer and a former Certified Grade IV Water Treatment Plant Operator. I have more than 26 years of experience... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am MDT
Sage

11:00am MDT

Lessons Learned from Emergency Situations
Marie will pull from her nearly 25 years of experience working with drinking water utilities to discuss emergencies that she has been involved in. She will discuss causes and impacts from the emergencies and then follow-up with lessons learned. She will discuss ways that situations could have been dealt with differently and more effectively. This presentation will discuss not only the technical aspects of the emergency but will also include the coordination and communications during and after the emergency.

Speakers
MO

Marie Owens

Director, Utah Division of Drinking Water
Marie Owens is the Director of the Utah Division of Drinking Water. As such she directs programs in compliance, emergency response, operator certification, cross-connection control, source water protection, and SRF Funding for drinking water utilities in the State of Utah.Prior to... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am MDT
Opera House

11:00am MDT

Watering Idaho: The Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer and Conjunctive Administration
Idaho is a prior appropriation state that administers junior ground water rights conjunctively with senior surface water rights, resulting in the curtailment of junior ground water pumping that causes material injury to senior surface water users. Conjunctive administration has occurred, primarily, within the boundaries of the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer (“ESPA”).
The ESPA is approximately 170 miles long and 60 miles wide as defined by the United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 1408-F, 1992. IDAPA 37.03.11.050. The ESPA is predominately in fractured Quaternary basalt having an aggregate thickness that may, in some locations, exceed several thousand feet, decreasing to shallow depths in other locations. The ESPA fractured basalt is characterized by high hydraulic conductiveness, typically 1,000 feet/day but ranging from 0.1 feet/day to 100,000 feet/day. The presence of interbedded sediments, a volcanic rift zone, and less permeable basalts in lower hydraulic conductivity in some areas of the aquifer. Notable areas of lower hydraulic conductivity are in the vicinity of Mud Lake and in the Great Rift zone, which extends north to south across the plain from the Craters of the Moon to just west of American Falls Reservoir. These zones of lower hydraulic conductivity impede the transmission of water through the aquifer. In two areas of note, ground water is in direct hydraulic connection with the Snake River: (1) American Falls Reservoir; and (2) the Thousand Springs.
Based on the period 1980-2008, the ESPA receives approximately 7.7 million acre-feet of recharge on an average annual basis through: (1) incidental recharge associated with surface water irrigation on the plain (5.3 million acre-feet); (2) underflow from tributary drainage basins (1.1 million acre-feet), (3) infiltration of precipitation on non-irrigated lands (0.7 million acre-feet); and (4) seepage losses from rivers and streams (0.6 million acre-feet). During this time period, average annual discharge from the ESPA exceeded annual average recharge by approximately 270,000 acre-feet, resulting in declining aquifer levels and declining discharge to hydraulically connected reaches of the Snake River and tributary springs.
Using Modflow, and in collaboration with stakeholders, the Idaho Department of Water Resources (“IDWR”), developed a calibrated ground water model to predict the impacts of pumping from the ESPA and benefits of curtailment at hydraulically connected reaches of the Snake River and tributary springs.
Since 2005, and in response to conjunctive management delivery calls filed by senior surface water irrigators that rely on reach gains in and around the area of American Falls Reservoir, and senior spring users that rely on spring discharge in and around the Thousand Springs area, IDWR has curtailed ground water pumping for the benefit of the senior users. These curtailments have included domestic, commercial, municipal, and industrial ground water rights.
1 Technical information regarding the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer is sourced from the Idaho Department of Water Resources’ administrative orders in the Surface Water Coalition and Rangen, Inc. conjunctive management delivery calls.

Speakers
CB

Chris Bromley

McHugh and Bromley
Chris Bromley is a founding member of McHugh Bromley, PLLC, a law firm focusing on water law and administrative law. Through his practice, Chris represents water users in front of the Idaho Department of Water Resources (“IDWR”) in matters involving water rights and water administration... Read More →


Friday October 11, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am MDT
Continental

11:45am MDT

The Fire that Saved Sun Valley
The Closing Luncheon will culminate with the third of a trio of Keynote Speakers who discuss watershed issues and the effects that wildfire has on the people and environment. We will begin with The Fire That Saved Sun Valley, a short film about learning to adapt in a changing world and to the natural phenomena we cannot control. The film, featuring our Keynote Speaker Joe St. Onge plus professional skiers Tyler Ceccanti, Anna Segal and Collin Collins, chronicles the aftermath of two of Central Idaho’s most destructive wildfires in recent years, and details how destruction inevitably results in change.
The film is a gentle reminder that wildfires are destructive and scary, but they are a natural phenomenon that wreak havoc on nature only to revitalize it in their wake.

Speakers

Friday October 11, 2019 11:45am - 1:30pm MDT
Limelight Ballroom B